High Intensity Grinding Course

Upcoming Courses

September 11-13, 2019

Biberach, Germany

Hosted by Vollmer

Focus on grinding tungsten-carbide “hard metal”

 

October 8-10, 2019

Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA

Hosted by S.L. Munson & Co & IGA Abrasives

Will change how your

company grinds.

Seriously.

An investment in your grinding operations that will pay for itself almost immediately – and many, many times over.

 

Goal: Give attendees an in-depth understanding of production grinding along with the knowledge and tools to make significant, long-term improvements to their grinding operations. Provide attendees with intensive, practical supporting material – The Book of Grinding® and The Grinder’s Toolbox® – to enable them to continue their grinding education for years after the course.

 

Prerequisites: Previous experience in production grinding, preferably several years. This is not an introductory class nor is it a light overview of the subject.

 

Takeaways: The most popular option and the best investment for those wishing to gain an in-depth understanding of grinding and make long-term improvements. Previous attendees have reported back major cost-savings and generally better grinding and troubleshooting by gaining a logical, scientific approach to grinding.

 

In-depth, long-term grinding education: The High Intensity Grinding Course is three days long. However, for many attendees, the course is just the beginning of their grinding education. Each attendee receives The Book of Grinding. This practical, graphics-focused, electronic, 4000-page educational resource has been 20 years and 20,000 hours in the making. Many attendees use this material for years after the course. Attendees also receive The Grinder’s Toolbox, a program for calculating optimum grinding, dressing and cooling parameters.

 

 

Schedule

Cost

FAQs

Facts

Topics

Video

Testimonials

Register

Day 1

 

 

 

 

 

Day 2

 

 

 

 

 

Day 3

8:00 a.m.

8:30 a.m.

12:00 p.m.

1:00 p.m.

7:00 p.m.

 

8:30 a.m.

12:15 p.m.

1:00 p.m.

1:30 p.m.

 

 

8:30 a.m.

12:00 p.m.

12:45 p.m.

4:00 p.m.

– 8:15 a.m.

– 12:00 p.m.

– 1:00 p.m.

– 4:30 p.m.

 

 

– 12:00 p.m.

– 1:00 p.m.

– 1:30 p.m.

– 6:00 p.m.

 

 

– 12:00 p.m.

– 12:45 p.m.

– 4:00 p.m.

 

registration, coffee available

course

group lunch at nearby restaurant, included in price of course

course

group dinner, spouses welcome, included in price of course

 

course

optional tour of host facilities

lunch, sandwiches at host

course

evening open

 

course

working lunch, pizza/sandwiches ordered in

course

course finished

 

 

 

1 Attendee

2 Attendees

3+ Attendees

Before Deadline

$4,350

$3,650 per attendee

$3,350 per attendee

After Deadline

$4,550

$3,850 per attendee

$3,550 per attendee

Q: Who should attend?

People who already have some experience and knowledge in grinding and want an in-depth understanding of grinding, dressing, cooling, thermal damage and chatter. Examples of people who have taken the course: Machines operators; grinding-wheel salespeople; an engineer at a coolant distributor who wants to understand coolant function and delivery and how to evaluate coolants; production manager who wants to understand issues facing his company and how to address them; engineer at OEM grinding-machine builder who wants to understand issues facing grinders and possible new features to add to his machines; diamond distributor who wants to understand customer needs and how to choose diamond & CBN properties; owner of grinding-wheel manufacturer who wants to understand his customers’ needs.

Q: Who should NOT attend?

People who want a light overview of grinding; people with little to no experience or knowledge in grinding; people looking for information on electrolytic in-process dressing, electro-chemical grinding, etc.; people using only coated abrasives, or looking for information on honing, lapping, polishing or abrasive-jet machining.

Q: I’m having scheduling conflicts but want to get started learning about grinding. What can I do?

Purchase The Book of Grinding, which is the material used in the course. Each purchaser receives one spot in the High Intensity Grinding Course which he/she can use during any course for up to three years after purchase.

Q: Do I need good math skills to attend the course?

No. The course contains some very basic math, but we have made much effort to make it very accessible to everybody with basic math skills. And, if you really despise math, you can always do the calculations in The Grinder’s Toolbox, which is included in the course.

Q: My English isn’t great. Will that be a problem during the course?

The course will be held in English. I have lived and worked around the world and speak standard, easy-to-understand, international English. Hundreds of non-native English speakers have attended my grinding courses and lectures. Moreover, my courses are centered around The Book of Grinding, presented on-screen in Powerpoint, and have a very graphics-heavy emphasis – charts, graphs, figures, even cartoons – rather than a word-heavy emphasis. Therefore, even people with limited English will benefit greatly from the course. In addition, attendees receive The Book of Grinding, which they can study in detail after the course.

Q: Will I receive a diploma or certificate?

Yes. On the last day, each attendee receives a framed certificate of attendance.

Q: The course at the large grinding-wheel manufacturer is less expensive. Why shouldn’t I just take that course?

First, numerous people have told me that they first took that course, and later the High Intensity Grinding Course. They all said the same thing: the High Intensity Grinding Course is way more practical, more accessible, more useful and less commercial. (One attendee wrote in the course evaluation, “I learned ten times more here than I did at the wheel-manufacturer’s course.”) Second, The Grinding Doc’s course is non-commercial. You will get no sales pitch on new wheels, just hardcore facts on grinding.

If you’re still not convinced, attend both. And if you’ll sincerely state, and put in writing, “I learned more at the wheel-manufacturer’s course than at The Grinding Doc’s course,” we’ll refund the price. Seriously.

First course:

Courses to date:

Attendees to date:

Total company investment:

Reported company savings:

Unreported company savings:

Repeat-company attendees:

 

 

Most popular subjects:

 

 

Impartiality:

2008

40

500+

approximately $1,200,000

$14,500,000+

Unknown

40% (attendees from companies which have already sent people to the course or have had an in-house Grinding Boot Camp)

Aggressiveness, coolant application, eliminating thermal damage and grinding burn, diagnosing chatter, reducing cycle times.

The High Intensity Grinding Course is non-promotional. You will learn about grinding and only grinding. Course hosts receive no air-time to promote their products.

High Intensity Grinding Course

 

High Intensity Grinding Course – Tungsten-Carbide Focus

 

 

Topics covered in The Grinding Doc’s three-day High Intensity Grinding Course

PDF download here.

 

Day 1: Morning – introduction • how to get the most out of the course • how to use The Book of Grinding • Dr. Badger’s background • introduction of attendees, type of grinding they’re doing, issues they’re facing • abrasive types, hardness • grit/workpiece chemical reactions • chip-formation in grinding • cutting, rubbing & plowing contact mechanisms • wheel wear types, how they affect cutting, rubbing & plowing • fundamental calculation: calculating surface speed from RPM & diameter, calculating RPM from surface speed & diameter, using The Grinder’s Toolbox • milling-cutter analogy for chip thickness: how changing wheel speed, feedrates & depths of cut affect wheel wear & burn risk • wheel grade or “hardness” • relationship between normal & tangential force & grinding power • heat generation & power • wear flats • reading a conventional-wheel specification • angular/blocky, tough/friable, micro/microfracture of grits, when to use which grit • wheel structure & porosity, when porous wheels help, when they hurt • grit size & surface finish, the biggest cause of grinding burn & chatter • The Grinder’s Mantra: big-&-dull bad, small-&-sharp good • grinding power & The Grindometer • fundamental calculation: Q’ in surface grinding, in cylindrical grinding • Group Exercise: calculating Q’, choosing a good Q’ & applying it across all production • using The Grinder’s Toolbox to calculate Q’ • specific energy, what it means, how to use it • wheel wear: break-in, steady wear & wheel collapse • The No-Dress Test, using it to evaluate wheels, optimize cycles.

 

Day 1: Afternoon – diamond dressing, stationary dressing • different types of dressers • effect of depth, why typically not a problem • effect of traverse speed, why most important parameter • fundamental calculation: dressing overlap ratio • how overlap ratio affects wheel sharpness & burn • diamond wear, how this changes, how it affects overlap ratio and burn & chatter risk • Group Exercise: calculating Overlap Ratio for increasing diamond-flat size, how it affects burn risk • rotary dressing • uni-directional vs. anti-direction, sharp & dull • rotary plunge roll, calculating effective depth, dwell, how this affects sharpness, using The Grinder’s Toolbox to quantify dressing sharpness • traverse disc dressing • RPM ratios & “integer values”, how this causes wheel “eggyness” • Introduction to Aggressiveness • Group Discussion: How to quantify multiple changing parameters.

 

Day 2: Morning – Aggressiveness defined, how it’s different from equivalent chip thickness & grit penetration depth • using aggressiveness it to increase feedrates, reduce burn, reduce wheel wear, find the “sweet spot” of the wheel • Using The Grinder’s Toolbox to calculate aggressiveness • keeping the same aggressiveness to reduce set-up time • Group Exercise: calculating Q’ & aggressiveness, keeping the same aggressiveness, increasing feedrate for same aggressiveness • cooling • the hot-spot in cooling • pressure, velocity, flowrate in cooling • Cooling Rule 1: V-coolant = V-wheel • The bucket-&-stopwatch technique for calculating velocity • Group Exercise: Calculating coolant velocity & pressure • Cooling Rule 2: aim at interface • partition ratio & arc length, when good cooling is needed, when it’s not, when good cooling can actually cause problems • nozzle options: Dr. Cool Rouse/Webster-style, Grindaix needle-nose, SwivelJet, crimped-down copper tubes – when to outsource, when to build yourself • cooling for genuine thermal damage vs. oxidation burn • film-boiling “burnout” • using The Grinder’s Toolbox to calculate cooling parameters • hydroplaning in cooling, the hidden cause of chatter, deflection, taper, barreling, difficulties holding size, how to handle it • scrapers, false nips & shoe nozzles: do they work? • cleaning nozzles: why they are usually worthless, how to design them correctly.

 

Day 2: Afternoon – superabrasives, definition, chemical reactions, why diamond doesn’t like iron, why CBN doesn’t like water • coatings/claddings • reading a superabrasive-wheel specification • concentration, when to choose high, low • grit size & surface finish, common mistakes • CBN on steel & nickel alloys, how they work, getting the wheel to “open up” quickly, then slowly • Group Discussion: choosing CBN parameters to avoid the early burn period • tungsten-carbide/cobalt “hard metal” • the ooze layer • loading in carbide grinding, how to cope • cleaning nozzles to reduce loading, why they usually don’t work • sticking to reduce loading • sticking speed, sticking aggressiveness • sticking grit size • truing of diamond wheels with SiC & alumina, which grit size to use, which parameters • hybrid-bond wheels, when to use, how to use • Paradigm wheel, when to use, how to use • electroplated wheels • extending life of electroplated wheels • water-based coolants & CBN, why so much trouble? • grinding of ceramics, fundamental contact mechanisms, how different • depth of damaged layer.

 

Day 3: Morning – loading, types, causes, in “soft” materials, in “hard” materials, ways to reduce loading, the “coolant quench effect” • burr, causes, how to reduce, dummy workpiece • up-grinding vs. down-grinding, is there a difference, cooling in up - vs. down-grinding • reducing cycle times, cycle mapping, “low hanging fruit”, where not to waste your energies • chatter: forced vs. self-excited • determining root cause from chatter spacing • out-of-balance & out-of-true chatter • snakeskin chatter, cause of • bouncy-diamond fishscale chatter, cause of • resonant frequencies, avoiding, frequency response function • why you should dress & grind at same RPM • wavelength obliteration • Group Exercise: determine source of chatter from number of chatter marks • thermal damage & “grinding burn” • different types: oxidation burn, thermal softening, residual tensile stresses, rehardending “white layer” burn • the biggest cause of burn: big-&-dull • testing for burn: nital etching, Barkhausen, x-ray diffraction, hardness testing • the danger of thinking “no cracks = no burn” • the danger of thinking “no discoloration = no burn” • material “sensitivity” & the risk of thermal damage.

 

Day 3: Afternoon – “ceramic abrasives”: how they work, how to get them to work, Norton SG, Cubitron, Cubitron II tortilla grit, Norton TG spaghetti grit, when it’s worth the cost, with which workpiece materials • cylindrical grinding: traverse & plunge • calculations in plunge grinding, in traverse grinding, overlap ratio in traverse, common mistakes in traverse, how to reduce cycle times & reduce burn risk in cylindrical traverse grinding • cup-wheel grinding, taper development • centerless grinding, choosing formulas, getting height-above center, swivel angle, dressing angle & dressing offset correct • Group Exercise: choosing cylindrical parameters wisely • using The Grinder’s Toolbox for cylindrical grinding • avoiding RPM-ratio “integer values”, the cause of waviness • 30-degree swivel, using The Grinder’s Toolbox • face-grinding, pain-&-suffering in face grinding, how to cope, sidewall relieving • barber-pole thread-pattern in traverse grinding, cause, how to eliminate it • barreling, taper, bell-mouth, deflection, thermal expansion, causes • inner-diameter ID grinding, challenges, cooling in, hydroplaning as cause of taper, bell-mouth • new developments in grinding, in grinding machines, in abrasives, when they’re worth the effort, when they’re not • closing, creation of a game-plan.

 

1Note that time and day where particular topics are presented may shift slightly.

2At the end of the course, each attendee will receive a framed, personalized diploma.

3All of The Grinding Doc’s courses center around the 4000-page Book of Grinding. Each attendee receives a copy of The Book of Grinding and The Grinder’s Toolbox.

 

 

 

Topics covered in The Grinding Doc’s three-day High Intensity Grinding Course – Tungsten-Carbide Focus

PDF download here.

 

Day 1: Morning – introduction • how to get the most out of the course • how to use The Book of Grinding • Dr. Badger’s background • introduction of attendees, type of grinding they’re doing, issues they’re facing • abrasive types, hardness • grit/workpiece chemical reactions • chip-formation in grinding • cutting, rubbing & plowing contact mechanisms • wheel wear types, how they affect cutting, rubbing & plowing • fundamental calculation: calculating surface speed from RPM & diameter, calculating RPM from surface speed & diameter, using The Grinder’s Toolbox • milling-cutter analogy for chip thickness: how changing wheel speed, feedrates & depths of cut affect wheel wear & burn risk • wheel grade or “hardness” • relationship between normal & tangential force & grinding power • heat generation & power • wear flats • reading a wheel specification • angular/blocky, tough/friable, micro/microfracture of grits, when to use which grit • why diamond doesn’t like iron, steel/carbide combinations • coatings/claddings • reading a superabrasive-wheel specification • concentration, when to choose high, low, edge-holding • wheel structure & porosity, when porous wheels help, when they hurt • grit size & surface finish • grinding power & The Grindometer • fundamental calculation: Q’ in surface grinding, in cylindrical grinding • Group Exercise: calculating Q’, choosing a good Q’ & applying it across all production • using The Grinder’s Toolbox to calculate Q’ • specific energy, what it means, how to use it • wheel wear: break-in, steady wear & wheel collapse • The No-Dress Test, using it to evaluate wheels, optimize cycles.

 

Day 1: Afternoon – Aggressiveness defined, how it’s different from equivalent chip thickness & grit penetration depth • using aggressiveness it to increase feedrates, reduce burn, reduce wheel wear, find the “sweet spot” of the wheel • Using The Grinder’s Toolbox to calculate aggressiveness • keeping the same aggressiveness to reduce set-up time • Group Exercise: calculating Q’ & aggressiveness, keeping the same aggressiveness, increasing feedrate for same aggressiveness • grinding of tungsten-carbide/cobalt “hard metal”: how it’s different to “soft” materials • the ooze layer, how it affects adherence of coatings • loading in carbide grinding, how to cope • choosing parameters to get a “self-sharpening wheel” to minimize sticking • cleaning nozzles to reduce loading, why they usually don’t work, how to design them correctly • sticking to reduce loading • sticking speed, sticking aggressiveness • Group Exercise: calculating sticking velocities with auto-stickers, hand-held stickers • sticking grit size • truing of diamond wheels with SiC & alumina, which grit size to use, which parameters • hybrid-bond wheels, when to use, how to use • Paradigm wheel, when to use, how to use • electroplated wheels • extending life of electroplated wheels • grinding of cermets: a quick introduction.

 

Day 2: Morning – cooling • the hot-spot in cooling • pressure, velocity, flowrate in cooling • Cooling Rule 1: V-coolant = V-wheel • The bucket-&-stopwatch technique for calculating velocity • Group Exercise: Calculating coolant velocity & pressure • Cooling Rule 2: aim at interface • partition ratio & arc length, when good cooling is needed, when it’s not, when good cooling can actually cause problems • nozzle options: Dr. Cool Rouse/Webster-style, Grindaix needle-nose, SwivelJet, crimped-down copper tubes – when to outsource, when to build yourself • cooling for genuine thermal damage vs. oxidation burn • film-boiling “burnout” • using The Grinder’s Toolbox to calculate cooling parameters • hydroplaning in cooling, the hidden cause of chatter, deflection, taper, barreling, difficulties holding size, how to handle it • scrapers, false nips & shoe nozzles: do they work?

 

Day 2: AfternoonOn a tool grinder: evaluating the process • Cycle mapping with the power signal • evaluating wheels with the No-Dress Test • Increasing feedrates while keeping the aggressiveness constant.

 

Day 3: MorningGroup Exercise: discussion of shop-floor results • up-grinding vs. down-grinding, is there a difference, cooling in up- vs. down-grinding • reducing cycle times, cycle mapping, “low hanging fruit”, where not to waste your energies • chatter: forced vs. self-excited • determining root cause from chatter spacing • out-of-balance & out-of-true chatter • snakeskin chatter, cause of • bouncy-diamond fishscale chatter, cause of • resonant frequencies, avoiding, frequency response function • why you should dress & grind at same RPM • wavelength obliteration • Group Exercise: determine source of chatter from number of chatter marks • thermal damage & “grinding burn” • oxidation burn • cooling just for oxidation burn.

 

Day 3: Afternoon –  wheel balancing, results of Vollmer/Grinding-Doc collaboration • cylindrical grinding: traverse & plunge • calculations in plunge grinding, in traverse grinding, overlap ratio in traverse, common mistakes in traverse, how to reduce cycle times & reduce burn risk in cylindrical traverse grinding • Group Exercise: choosing cylindrical-traverse parameters • cup-wheel grinding, taper development • centerless grinding, choosing formulas, getting height-above center, swivel angle, dressing angle & dressing offset correct • Group Exercise: choosing cup-wheel parameters, break-in period, taper period • using The Grinder’s Toolbox for cylindrical grinding • avoiding RPM-ratio “integer values”, the cause of waviness • 30-degree swivel, using The Grinder’s Toolbox • face-grinding, pain-&-suffering in face grinding, how to cope, sidewall relieving • barber-pole thread-pattern in traverse grinding, cause, how to eliminate it • barreling, taper, bell-mouth, deflection, thermal expansion, causes • inner-diameter ID grinding, challenges, cooling in, hydroplaning as cause of taper, bell-mouth • peel grinding & pinch/peel grinding • new developments in grinding, in grinding machines, in abrasives, when they’re worth the effort, when they’re not • closing, creation of a game-plan.

 

1Note that time and day where particular topics are presented may shift slightly.

2At the end of the course, each attendee will receive a framed, personalized diploma.

3All of The Grinding Doc’s courses center around the 4000-page Book of Grinding. Each attendee receives a copy of The Book of Grinding and The Grinder’s Toolbox.

The Grinding Doc’s three-day course was just the beginning of our education. I am now using the material from The Book of Grinding to educate people in my factory. I spend 30 minutes explaining a topic and then we discuss how it applies to our processes. The results have been amazing.”

“Two of us took The Grinding Doc’s three-course course. The following year our plated-CBN costs were reduced in the millions. We’re still kind of in shock.”

Randy, Engineer at major Japanese automotive manufacturer in the U.S.

“Completely changed the way we approach our grinding operations.”

Doug, Grinder of aerospace alloys

“The best technical course I have taken in any subject, ever.”

Boris, Grinder of nickel-alloy turbine blades

“Best seminar I have ever attended. I can't wait to get back to the shop on Monday and start trying out the things I learned.”

Karl, Blanchard & Cylindrical Grinder

“The first year  after attending the course, we reduced wheel costs several million dollars. We had no idea  how much about grinding we didn’t know.”

Frank, large automotive-grinding facility.

Dates

September 11-13, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

October 8-10, 2019

 

 

 

March 23-25, 2020 *tentative

Location & Hosts

Biberach, Germany – Vollmer

Carbide course, pre-EMO

This is a special course, the week before the EMO trade-show, focused solely on grinding of tungsten-carbide/cobalt “hard metal”. There will be extra time given to on-machine demonstrations and optimization on the Vollmer Vgrind. In addition, a simultaneous headphone translation will be made in German.

 

Grand Rapids, Michigan  USA

S.L. Munson & Co. & IGA Abrasives

Classic High Intensity Grinding Course

 

Celle, Germany

Dr. Kaiser

Classic High Intensity Grinding Course

Reduced Price Deadline

August 25, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

September 28, 2019

 

 

 

 

How to register

 

  1. Send email to admin@TheGrindingDoc.com with: a) desired course location and dates; b) name(s) of attendees(s); and c) description of the type of grinding attendees are doing and issues they are facing.
  2. Pay.

         Option 1: Credit-card

         Option 2: Bank transfer or check in U.S. dollars. See invoice for details.

    3.  Visit the hotel page for information on course location and recommended hotels.